DAHSL: Developing Academic Health Sciences Libraries

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a collaboration to create the 21st century academic health sciences library…

Inkling event at AAMC

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Filed under: Virtual Library,

WILLIAM H. WELCH LIBRARY AT JOHNS HOPKINS GOING DIGITAL

Librarians at Johns Hopkins Unversity in Baltimore, MD are turning their focus to digital delivery of library materials, noting that they will be able to spend more on online materials by closing the doors on the physical facility.  As of January 1, 2010, they will be completely online.  Read more in the  The Digital Shift or Out of the Jungle: Johns Hopkins To Close Its Medical Library.

Filed under: Administrative Issues, Renovating, user experience, Virtual Library,

In the 21st-Century University, Let’s Ban Books

Posted on November 16, 2011 by Editor | Edit

By Marc Prensky in the Chronicle of Higher Education Wired Campus

Recent news that South Korea plans to digitize its entire elementary- and secondary-school curriculum by 2015, combined with the declining cost of e-readers and Amazon’s announcement earlier this year that it is selling more e-books than print books, prompts an interesting question: Which traditional campus will be the first to go entirely bookless? Not, of course, bookless in the sense of using no book content, but bookless in the sense of allowing no physical books. My guess is that this will make some institution famous.

Already, just about everything that an undergraduate needs to read is available in electronic form. Whatever isn’t there electronically, librarians, students, or professors can easily scan, as many already do.

Some colleges are already heading in this direction by requiring or handing out iPod Touches, iPads, Kindles, or Nooks, often preloaded with textbooks and other curricular materials, or by disallowing paper texts for online courses. But I suggest that it’s time to go much further: to actually ban nonelectronic books on campus. That would be a symbolic step toward a much better way of teaching and learning, in which all materials are fully integrated. It could involve a pledge similar to the one that language students and instructors at Middlebury Language Schools take to speak only the foreign languages in which they are immersed during the study program. Read the rest of this entry »

Filed under: New Libraries, Virtual Library, ,

Science moves from the stacks to the Web; print too pricey

from ars technicahttp://arstechnica.com/web/news/2009/07/academic-publisher-reportedly-going-online-only.ars

If information isn’t online, it may as well not exist. In the latest sign that the world of traditional print has become a world of hurt, the American Chemical Society is reported to be planning to switch to an online-only publishing model for its journals.

By John Timmer | Last updated July 6, 2009 1:03 PM CT

Last week, the head of the US branch of Oxford University Press noted an event that was striking, if unsurprising. When grading an assigned paper, a Columbia University professor found that the majority of his students had cited an obscure work of literary criticism that was roughly a century old. The reason? Because the work was in Google Book Search, while much other (more recent) work was not.

The relative invisibility of offline information has an impact on almost all areas of life, but it’s felt especially acutely in the academic world, where work builds on the existing body of knowledge. Getting all of that dead-tree information onto the Internet (or into archives like J-Stor) would be of tremendous utility to scholars and students, but convenience isn’t the only reason for digital distribution of academic work. A recent decision by a prominent academic publisher to switch to digital-only distribution was apparently motivated by simple economics: print no longer made financial sense…read entire post at URL above!

Filed under: Virtual Library, ,

The Campus of the 21st Century … It is now.

From Campus  Technology:

With a new administration taking over in Washington D.C., educators and technologists alike are redoubling their emphasis on 21st Century Campus. In the world of higher education, this means a renewed commitment to familiarizing students with the hardware, software and services that can prepare them to meet challenges of the new millennium. Most 21st Century Campus initiatives also are designed to help students develop the ability to communicate, collaborate, think critically, utilize media to gather information and incorporate awareness of the world around them.  To prepare for the campus of tomorrow, we all must act today….See entire story at: http://campustechnology.com/microsites/cdwg/the-future-is-now.aspx

Filed under: Virtual Library,

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